Sample Submission

Students who have begun writing their research should submit:
1. Abstract, with name and contact information.
AND
2. Research Paper (partial paper or completed paper)

Students who have yet to begin writing their paper should submit:
1. Abstract, with name and contact information.

Students submitting a Poster Board Presentation should submit:
1. Abstract, with name and contact information.

Students submitting a Performance Presentation should submit:
1. Abstract, with name and contact information.
AND
2. Script or outline (partial or completed)

All submissions must include the following content, on a detachable cover page:

AUTHOR'S NAME: Thomas Michael Greens (in case of multiple authors, please list them ALL)
AUTHOR’S MOST USED E-MAIL: Me@yahoo.com
TITLE: Clubs, secret societies and male quest romance (Rudyard Kipling, H. Rider Haggard, & Bram Stoker).
ACADEMIC AFFILIATION: SCHOOL UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST
I understand that submitting this research functions as a contract; I promise to attend and present at the conference should my submission be accepted.

ABSTRACT:
The psychological realm in which late nineteenth century male romance takes place is not simply an anarchic land liberated from the conventional constraints of Victorian morality. Rather it is a complex male space that reflects the dynamics, protocols and contradictions of nineteenth century middle-class masculine relations as embodied in male fraternal associations such as public schools, secret societies, and the clubland of London's West End. A historical survey of London clubs and secret societies demonstrates the characteristics and social function of these institutions in defining and sustaining prevailing models of masculinity. An examination of Rudyard Kipling's Kim in relation to Masonic symbolism and initiation rites shows the didactic role of boys' fiction in transmitting and sustaining the imperial masculine ideology. A reading of H. Rider Haggard's African novels demonstrates the dynamics of idealized middle-class fraternal relations. Finally, an analysis of Bram Stoker's novels illustrates issues of male communities in dealing with alien others. In an environment in which men perceived an increasing threat from outside social forces, the network of fraternal associations, quest romance and masculine ideologies created a dynamic that illuminates a more complex reading of the culture and literature of the genre.

5-8 keywords: Literature, English, Fraternal Associations, Social Function, Masculinity, Social Networks

Please circle your preferred presentation type:

Traditional panel presentation without technology needed

Traditional panel presentation with technology needed

Roundtable Discussion without technology needed

Roundtable Discussion with technology needed

Poster Board without technology needed

Poster Board with technology needed

Performance without technology needed

Performance with technology needed


Please answer the following:

Do you plan to present as part of a pre-planned group? __________
or as an Individual __________ (check only one)

If you are part of a group, please list all the names of each group member

Your name:                     

Member:                     

Member:                     

Member:                     

Member:                     

Member: